• Goodbye Jan (woman with gun) by Jan Saudek

    Jan Saudek | Extraordinary Erotica

    Maybe today it's easy to succeed in the art of erotica, if by that for an artist, is meant to make an exhibition and find their name in the newspaper. But what really separates some artists from all...

    Maybe today it’s easy to succeed in the art of erotica, if by that for an artist, is meant to make an exhibition and find their name in the newspaper. But what really separates some artists from all others is the ability to be noticeable without being aware that they have achieved this level of recognition. Despite numerous painters, who are lovers of paintbrushes and tempera, there are the artists who have driven their passion towards the digital and photography. One of them, the rarest among all, is Jan Saudek, a renowned Czech photographer.

    “There are too many imitators – I do not want to show the way to anyone anymore.” – Jan Saudek

    Born in Prague in 1935, several years just before World War II, Saudek is forced to face the consequences that will follow only because of his origins. His father was Jewish and many of his relatives ended their lives in a concentration camp. Jan and his brother were also deported to the camp, separated from their father, who shared the same fate with their sons. All of them survive this period. Stuck between memories of murdered children, the sound of shots, a person’s last breaths and his dreams, Jan begins to explore the possibilities and the magic of photography. In 1950 he got his first camera, Kodak Baby Brownie. This was the beginning of the art war lead by Jan against the political system, his family and his lustful dreams.

    Hyperbole erotic photography by Jan Saudek
    Jan Saudek | Hyperbole

    To understand his art, you need to glance into the deepest and darkest parts of his being. He is like a house with many floors and windows, each one offering a different view. Jan Saudek is the second child in the family, and as he said, “he is predestined to spend all his life as No. 2.” Saudek yearned for physical love since his young years. He lost his virginity at 15, with a girl who was also a virgin. His life is filled with failed relationships, passionate relationships, ruined marriages and separation from his children. Saudek, like any conscious artist, has managed in his own way to fight against the military and the communist regime. Often, he had no opportunity to express his views through his works because they were banned. Travelling to the USA was the first step that led Jan to success. He explored all forms of art, but mostly focused on his unique life companion: photography.

    Jan Saudek has the courage that many of us dream of.

    Life experiences, passions and interests are transferred to the works of Jan Saudek. He creates paintings and photos that speak of: the beauty of life, childhood, dreams, desires and unfulfilled plans, human nature, body and nudity, love and hate, sexuality and sexual attraction, passion, sadism and masochism, domination, melancholy, depression and doubts, life and death, fantasies hidden in the human mind. The works of this extraordinary artist could be the new art genre that has not been named yet.

    Victory on the Sea by Jan Saudek
    Jan Saudek | Victory on the Sea (1993)

    Eroticism in the works of this Czech genius is shown through human body and nudity. Jan Saudek has the courage that many of us dream of. Through his photographs, he depicts the female body the way it is, no uniformity, no stereotypes or rules. The female body is presented as a figure of femininity. Sex, penetration, defloration and making love are not taboo for Jan Saudek. Rather, he revives these moments by putting emphasis on the most intimate parts of the human imagination. What other people were seeing as prohibited, incompatible and kitsch – Jan Saudek has used it as the foundation of his art. In the late seventies, his black and white images gain a new dimension; Saudek began to use techniques, which included color, tinting and hand painting.  Using bold colors, Saudek reaches climax in displaying his individuality. His works not only depict nudity; they themselves are nudity. They are honest, open, without fear or embarrassment to show what lies in the mind and soul of an artist or a simple man. Many of the models in the pictures were his wives, girlfriends, lovers, and children.

    Who Cares nude photography by Jan Saudek
    Jan Saudek | Who Cares (1987)

    The representation of women and the female body is easily noticeable in Saudek’s photographs. He exalts the naked body of a woman in a sophisticated, erotic way. Often it can be aggressive, even grotesque. The female sex organ, its utilization or purity is shown with unprecedented passion. Some of his photos show details of masochism and sadism, sexual domination of masculinity that owns the female body – all this without the intention to harm the woman. Rather, he loves all women beings through his sincere art. The male body is also represented. It is solid, tight and good-looking. The man in the work of Saudek adores the woman; he is experiencing sexual delirium, he enters into an unknown world of sexual fantasy and lust.

    The mandolina lesson colored photograph by Jan Saudek
    Jan Saudek | The Mandolina Lesson (1994)

    Other detail that must not be missed is the vacant room (chambre libre) that Jan uses when making portraits and expressions of his dreams, capturing the moment of imaginativeness. The room is empty; there is no furniture, only details and a model. Often, the room would have cloudy walls that take one’s mind to the farthest dreams using colorful carpet, skulls, cradles, sex toys, artworks, mirrors and props.

    Saudek gives you a peek into his genius mind, and from his life experience brings us controversial beauty through erotica.

    AT, (2015)

    Art Provocateur is the premier online gallery of erotic art prints. Browse our erotic art gallery for limited edition and one-of-a-kind artwork. We have the largest selection of erotic and nude art from both established artists and rising stars.

  • Limited Edition Photography

    Comparing Erotic & Nude Art: What’s The Difference?

    Erotic and nude art have some similar attributes, but they are ultimately two different genres. In this piece, we take a look at how to recognize the difference between them. As an erotic art gallery, we...

    Erotic and nude art have some similar attributes, but they are ultimately two different genres. In this piece, we take a look at how to recognize the difference between them. As an erotic art gallery, we often see confusion between these two artistic genres. This piece will help to see how they differ.

    Limited Edition Photography
    Crucifix | Ben Ernst

    Defining Nude Art

    Nude art is any fine artwork that depicts the naked human body as its primary subject. It has been a longstanding genre across many forms of media throughout the ages. From the nude statues of the Ancient Greeks, to Renaissance painters like Sandro Botticelli, to modern nude photographers like Ben Ernst.

    The human form has been a central theme in art since inception, and nudity the most honest depiction and expression of it.

    Defining Erotic Art

    Erotic art is fine artwork that is intended to arouse the viewer, and/or depicts sexual activity. Both erotic themes and artistic merit define this genre. Erotic art could be appreciated as fine art even void of arousal. This separates it from pornography or obscenity.

    Although erotic and nude art are generally separate genres, there are similarities between the two. These grey areas are largely responsible for common misidentification between the genres.

    The Grey Areas

    In the public eye, these two genres are too often seen as one and the same. One of the big causes of this is the use of nudity itself. But, nudity alone does not constitute erotica. Erotic nude art is a popular subgenre that may further the confusion, as it falls directly into both categories.

    All nude art depicts nudity. Erotic art depicts eroticism, with or without nudity. Just because artwork shows the naked body, does not automatically qualify it as erotic art.

    There are many themes and fetishes in erotic art that do not involve nudity. Fetish apparel, for instance, ascribes sexuality to wearing certain clothes. Pin-up photography is a popular category of erotica that, more often than not, does not contain nudity. Artists frequently depict eroticism without nudity.

    Lesbian Erotic Art
    Steven Perry | Lick My Donut

     

    Other categories of erotic art, such as bondage photography, contain nudity although it is not the primary erotic driver. Instead, that comes from factors like the exchange of power, intimacy, and mastery of skill.

    Another factor that frequently draws a parallel between the two genres is censorship. Both erotic and nude art have fallen victim to censorship. In theory, censorship is intended to protect the public from offensive or harmful material. Instead, it too often sees use as a means of suppressing artistic creation.

    Neither nudity nor erotica necessarily falls under the vein of “offensive” or “harmful” so long as they constitute fine art. The arguments for and against the censorship of both genres are similar enough that they are easily painted with the same brush.

    Key Differences Between Erotic & Nude Art

    The two key differences between erotic and nude art are the intent and the effect. Although both genres are fine art, they serve separate purposes.

    Erotic art has the specific intention of causing arousal in the viewer. Intent is how many artists categorize the piece as belonging to one genre or the other. Nude art is not made with this intention, even though it can cause arousal in viewers. The difference is whether eroticism is clearly the purpose.

    For example, consider a popular bit among comedians discussing the Sears catalog. They tell stories of being aroused by Sears models during their youth, tearing out pages or hoarding catalogs. Of course, the intention the Sears catalog was not to evoke arousal. So even though arousal may have occurred to a minority of viewers, it did not constitute erotic art.

    Lingerie Ads
    1970s Sears Catalog | Lingerie Ads

     

    Having said that, effect can determine a piece as an erotic nude, rather than a nude. Regardless of the artist’s intent, if the majority of viewers find the piece evokes an erotic arousal, it may fall under the category of erotica. The difference between this and the Sears example is that the people perceiving the art as erotic in the example are outliers rather than a general consensus.

    Effect can work the opposite way as well. For example, an erotic photographer may have prints of a nude model intended for viewers with a foot fetish. For those without a foot fetish, they can appreciate the artistic value of the piece, but the erotic appeal may be lost on them. Outside of this particular fetish community, this piece may be deemed nude art rather than erotic.

    Fetish Art
    Watermelon Toes | Perry Gallagher

     

    Does Individual Perception Matter?

    From a broad categorization sense, the difference between nudity and erotica isn’t based on the individual viewer. But, from a more personal standpoint, individual perception matters more. The owner of erotic artwork may choose to purchase and/or display an art print because of their personal connection with it.

    When buying art, the most important aspect is finding a piece that appeals to your tastes, sensibilities, and desires. For more tips for buyers view our Guide to Shopping for Limited Edition Art. Or, browse our gallery of nude and erotic art from both established and up-and-coming artists.

    Art Provocateur is the premier online gallery of erotic art prints.  Browse our galleries of limited edition and one-of-a-kind artwork. We have the largest selection of erotic and nude art from both established artists and rising stars.

  • Erotic Photography

    Why You Should Buy Limited Edition Art

    There’s a prestige that goes along with owning limited edition art, but it comes with a price tag. Is it really worth it with so much mass-produced art available for less? True, limited edition fine art...

    There’s a prestige that goes along with owning limited edition art, but it comes with a price tag. Is it really worth it with so much mass-produced art available for less? True, limited edition fine art prints aren’t for everybody, but their appeal is hardly just for collectors and connoisseurs.

    We take a look at some of the reasons you may want to shop for limited edition art:

    Erotic Photography
    Frank Verbreyt | Geisha (3)

    Because You Want To Make An Investment

    Art is a unique investment. When you invest in stocks, your investment is all but invisible until you sell. With investing in real estate there is constant maintenance and you have to pray the housing market doesn’t collapse like it did in 2008.

    When you buy art, on the other hand, you have the immediate benefit of owning art. You don’t need to fix it or maintain it, you can simply enjoy it in your home, office, or collection. This makes art an appealing investment as you wait for its value to mature.

    Limited edition art appreciates in value over time. As the artist grows in popularity early prints can be especially valuable. Buying from emerging artists can be especially lucrative, as the value of their work has the potential for a significant increase as the artist makes their way into the spotlight.

    Mass produced art doesn’t have this same appreciation because the lack of scarcity makes it too available to retain high value. Limited edition art prints have an inherent scarcity due there being only a select number of prints. As well, they are a lower-risk investment than original or one-of-a-kind art because their initial price is lower.

    The art investment market is in a state of growth. Especially in the West where the USA has become the largest art market in the world.

    Limited edition Photography
    Alexrm | Wind

    Because The Quality Is Better

    The digital era is ushering in the democratization of art. While online print-on-demand shops services like Printful and Redbubble allow for the mass production of art, allowing artists to sell easily. However, the quality of these prints is more dubious.

    Mass art producing companies do not adhere to the same strict quality standards as you find in limited edition art. For limited prints, the printer and artist may go through a number of proofs, setting up the printer to get the perfect print before production commences.

    It’s not just the printing that is better. The quality of the medium being printed on matters as well. Using the highest quality printing paper and canvas results in a more appealing, more professional product that lasts.

    Sculptural Erotic Photography
    Nudes by Pierto | Chiara #8

    Because You Want To Support The Artist

    Buying art is the best way to support artists and the art community at large. Purchasing fine art prints doesn’t just help support the artist financially. It also helps them refine their art to match their audience, as well as growing their reputation.

    Successfully selling limited edition art collections help artists get their name out. Sales make it easier for them to get features in galleries, magazines, online reviews, and can even help them secure more commission work.

    When you purchase limited edition art, you help grow the artist’s value and reputation. In turn, this increases the value of the art you purchase.

    Couples Erotic Art
    Ben Ernst | What Love Has To Do With It

    Because The Distribution Is Limited

    Limited edition art has fewer prints. Fewer prints mean greater scarcity, which means each print has greater value. While this is great for investment purposes, the benefits are not only financial.

    The scarcity means your fine art print is more unique. That makes it more personal to you. You can really make a statement about you and/or the room you are decorating when the piece is less readily available. Mass produced art can look nice, but it doesn’t speak the same way.

    More unique art is an effective conversation piece and has more allure. People are attracted to art they are unfamiliar with. It gives a better impression of your art knowledge as well as adding prestige.

    Erotic Photographer
    Craig Colvin | Womb Mates

    Shop Limited Edition Art

    Art Provocateur is an online gallery featuring the finest limited edition nude and erotic art from a mix of established and growing artists. We partner with the highest quality printing services and even have exclusive contracts with some of our artists. You can discover titillating fine art prints you won’t find anywhere else.

    Browse our collection of limited edition erotic art today.

  • Erotic Photography

    Capturing Sexuality With Burlesque Photography

    Burlesque photography is art intended to run against the grain of normal society. By design, this style is not for everyone, as it is often seen as shocking or offensive in the mainstream. But in the...

    Burlesque photography is art intended to run against the grain of normal society. By design, this style is not for everyone, as it is often seen as shocking or offensive in the mainstream. But in the world of erotic photography, burlesque is one of the most popular styles.

    Burlesque itself dates back as far as the 17th century in Spain. However, modern burlesque photography prints usually portray themes and styles from Victorian London or New York in the 19th and 20th centuries.

    Burlesque is best recognized for sexual themes and risqué comedy in a variety show format.

    Burlesque Photography
    Corrie Ancone | Luscious Scent 2010

     

    The Rise, Fall, & Revival of Burlesque

    The early roots of burlesque focused on parody and satire. It began as a literary movement, mocking or ridiculing themes in literary works. Even the Bard himself, William Shakespeare is sometimes considered as a burlesque playwright.

    It was often sexual in nature and critiqued or parodied serious subjects or societal norms. Early burlesque relied on an intellectual and highly literate audience.

    Burlesque Photography
    Patrick Kaas | Red Room
    Victorian Burlesque

    In the 1830s Victorian burlesque grew in popularity. The style had evolved into theatrical parody. Famous operas, plays, and ballets were recreated, with an absurdists view on their conventions, subjects.

    Travesty roles, where women in revealing tights play male characters, became a central theme. Music, sexuality, and garish dress became central themes in burlesque shows.

    By the end of the 19th-century burlesque had fallen out of favour in London, replaced with Edwardian musical comedy. But the tradition lived on in America.

     

    New York Burlesque

    Burlesque was introduced to New York during the heyday of Victorian burlesque. The American style became more of a variety show. Burlesques would include, songs, sketch comedy, acrobats, magicians, and political or theatrical parody. The grand finale was a fight or exotic dance.

    At the same time Victorian burlesque was fading in London, American burlesque began to flourish in New York. The shows became more sexual in nature, slowly developing into striptease shows.

    The popularity began to fade during prohibition and later was stamped out as nudity became more commonplace in theatre and cinema.

     

    Neo-Burlesque

    The 1990s resurrected burlesque performances. Although modern burlesque keeps up with some of the older themes and styles, the tone and purpose have changed. Where once the stripteases and dress were intended for sexual gratification of the audience, it is now used in the artist’s self-discovery and expression.

    Burlesque Art Prints
    Andrews Lucas | Catherine

    Burlesque Photography

    The focus on erotica and sexual gratification remain in the works of burlesque photographers. They produce tantalizing burlesque prints that capture sexual and social taboos over the past 200 years.

    The costume and dress of the subjects often date back to the Victorian era performances and harken to other elements of burlesque shows. Old-time aerialist, magician, and circus performer garb and activities are common.

    Burlesque Photo Print
    Stephen Perry | Masking The Mystery

    Some elements of neo-burlesque can play into this style of erotic photography. Boylesque, for instance, is relatively new. Boylesque is a role reversal where males are featured burlesques’ typical female roles. The men may be dressed in drag, or performing stripteases and erotic dances.

    Art Provocateur Gallery has prints, originals, and limited works from some of today’s best burlesque photographers. Browse our burlesque gallery today.